JimAndNena

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About JimAndNena

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  • Real Name:
    James Doughty
  • Reason for registering:
    Prefer not to state or not applicable
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    Prefer not to state or not applicable
  • Birth (home) country:
    EEUU
  1. This bit of "culture" far predates retiree arrivals. It started as soon as cellphones arrived in Panama. Folks with landline service didn't pay for local calling so folks with cellphones would call family and friends and hang up. The folks with landlines would call back so the cellphone users were not charged. This was especially popular with kids given cellphones by their parents to keep track of them. The parents or friends would say, "dame una perdida", one ring, two rings, etc. As time progressed, anyone with paid cellphone charges called and hung up. If the person called wanted to spend money talking to the caller, he made the call. If not, he didn't. jim
  2. And it is still functioning better than the expansion project. Old technology may be better.
  3. No proof except that I sat with them and had a beer. Keep in mind, this was 30+ years ago before I took the pledge. Or perhaps it didn't happen. Much of that period is hazy to me now. I am sure all the drivers are sober and drug-free now. As I posted, it looks a lot like mechanical failure. Maybe the mechanics, maybe act of God, maybe poor road conditions. We're you on the bus? Can you give any information? jim
  4. I think I spotted your problem. You should have a few drinks with the bus driver before boarding! Why be the only one on the bus who is sober?
  5. We have been riding the buses to/from David for years, always an adventure. The "new" double deck buses are great on daytime trips but we were usually on the midnight express. The single biggest safety advance in 40 years was when the drivers were limited to 7 hours as their fastest time for the trip. The real fun was riding the Diablo Rojos. jim
  6. I am going to guess the rear axle locked up on one side. Lack of maintenance issue. Driver's side of the axle moved backward, disconnected the driveshaft, back end of the bus goes left, driver steers into the "skid", bus rolls over onto the passenger side. If going fast enough, it all happens in an eyeblink. It might buff out? jim
  7. No real effort to generate revenue, it is just how it is done. If there are no arrows, turn where you want. If there are arrows, pick one and follow it. Boquete only has about 3 one way streets so arrows are few. Lots of crosswalks however as the town is small and walking is really the fastest way to get around. Once you find a parking space, you may not find another. jim
  8. Very common occurrence for a very early arrival. The gate times are scheduled like everything at an airport, get there 10 minutes early and wait for the other flight to push back. Airports are like square dances, it is all in the timing. I love flying; I hate airports. jim
  9. The recent agreement between China and Panama is going to have an effect on Panama's future. Whether that future is better or worse than what Panama has now will depend on what China's long range plans are. China is already buying large areas of Panama near the canal and has already made purchases that indicate where it is headed. ---------------------------- Consolidating power in the Panama Canal By Callum Wood • June 22, 2016 For more than 100 years, the Panama Canal has controlled the bulk of goods transferred between the Pacific and the Atlantic. For much of that history, this monumental feat of engineering was under the control of the United States. But this is no longer the case. In May, Panama’s largest port was purchased by a Chinese company called Landbridge Group. Margarita Island Port, on the canal’s Atlantic side, offers the company intimate access to one of the most important goods distribution centers in the world. While promising to upgrade the ailing Panama facilities and offer more trade with America’s distant east coast, there is substantial reason to hesitate at the purchase of such a critical trade hub. https://www.thetrumpet.com/13973-china-buys-panamas-largest-port A year later we see that China has obtained the agreements to make progress with its One Belt One Road plan. What will be next? jim
  10. Hola John, And Omar Torrijos proved his National Guard troops patrolling Panama City were civilian police when he added stripes to their dress uniform pants to please the USA. If US troops were to be reinserted into Panama, I don't know where they would go. All the bases have been converted to other uses. Howard AFB, Albrook, Clayton, Amador, etc no longer exist. I would love to serve again on Fort Grant, I understand my old radio shack is now a 5 start hotel. jim
  11. Haven't read the treaty in a while but my memory is that Panama didn't want a military due to past dictators and opted for a helpline to the USA if something happened.
  12. I think I would check with these folks for info, Judy: Mail Boxes Etc. MAIL BOXES ETC. BOQUETE AVENIDA CENTRAL, LOCAL 2,EDIF. SAN ANDRES, CHIRIQUI Tel: (507)720-1019 jim
  13. You are cracking me up, Bonnie. Here's a photo of your favorite bridge from 1984. You can see the remains of the one washed away in 1970 in the "button". jim
  14. Have I gotta deal for you! 2 bucks a pair, all you can carry. And the pre-washed treatment is already there. https://familythriftcenter.com/store-locations/ jim