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So, basically you are just saying:

 

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Attitude definitely affects one's altitude (about their situation).

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I enjoyed the article.  Far too many people were enticed to move to Panama because they were led to believe they could live above their means here.  Those people have been gravely disappointed.  Other people didn't do enough due diligence about what you should expect from roads, utilities, and emergency services here.  They have been gravely disappointed.  Other people didn't understand the bureaucratic complexities for all things from immigration to car registration.  They have been gravely disappointed.

But, the people who come here and can go with the flow and adjust their expectations will find a beautiful country with some wonderful people.  There is an old saying that one man's trash is another man's treasure.  Our decision to move here was a good one.

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This article is a decided improvement over Mr. Bolotin's usual publications, and I applaud him for it. It is my view, however, that adjustment to a foreign culture has less to do with a happy attitude and more to do with the stamina and resilience necessary in order to maintain that attitude.

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Agree.  We've seen quite a few "happy attitudes" change through the years.  Tunes they whistled soon got a bit off key and before you know it they were packing to leave with resentments along with their baggage.

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I agree.  We had foreign assignments when I was working and while our kids were school age.  The assignments were 18 months to 3 years, and involved 50 to 100 people plus their families and they always followed the same pattern.  The first several months were times of exploration, and great friendships, and solving problems. Next was the month after month coping with each new challenge of living in a foreign culture. The last 4 months were filled with readying for repatriation, packing, disposing of household goods, etc.

The difference between those moves, and starting retirement is the realization at some point that there will be no repatriation and the month to month challenges will never end.  It is at that point that a decision must be made to stay or return or leave for another destination.  Returning may not be an option. Another destination may not be an option.

One extra factor is even if one does due diligence and finds paradise for a year or two, paradise itself may change into something that does resemble paradise.  The Boquete that is being sold now is not the Boquete that was sold in 1997.  And the changes have not all been good.

jim

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I don't know if JimAndNina's first post with the child's video was meant as a joke or to be serious.  However, I took it seriously.  I love that song, and used to sing it to my kids all the time.  The reason I did that is that I believe that, all other things being equal and absent some horrifically bad situation, if one acts happy, one will be happier.  I'll paraphrase the bible and what I wrote in the article: As a man thinketh, so he becomes.  I don't think there is any doubt about it: think miserable thoughts and you'll be more miserable.  Think more happy thoughts, and you will be  happier.  And who doesn't want to be happier?  The takeaway is to make it a habit and practice to see the best in everything and everybody.

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Yes...there is definatly something to that !  Some friends came here and sang a  happy tune, but in time left on a sour note,  What is interesting is that once dust settled for them in their new location, the tune we heard from them was as well a bit off key.  I guess location location location was not so much the factor.

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No matter where you go, there you are.9_9

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I don't think it has anything to do with location.  It's more a function of a person's ability to adapt.  Those that make it here could probably make it anywhere ( mas o menos) because they have an innate ability to adapt and enjoy.  Doesn't matter where you are ( well, OK, for me the primary demand is no snow!) if you have the mindset, you will be fine.  I'm here and happy, but I'd be just as happy in Singapore.

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7 minutes ago, Penny said:

No matter where you go, there you are.9_9

But are you happy to be there?

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1 hour ago, Bonnie said:

But are you happy to be there?

..that would depend on whether your glass is half full or half empty

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Posted (edited)

I have yet to see a good attitude repair a broken water main.  Or restore electrical power at 3AM.

Expats arrive with a certain expectation of services are going to be sorely tested in rural parts of any country south of the border. And as the number of expats increases, the services that have provided sufficient reliability for the locals for decades will quickly become erratic.  The expats themselves are responsible to some degree as the consumption of services increases dramatically with each new American style home.  The locals were always happy in spite of outages because they were not dependent on them. The host country is not interested in spending tax dollars on improving the infrastructure in the province because all the votes come from the capital city and expats don't vote.

I have read stories on the blogs of folks who were really intent on making it work. I don't believe they all failed due to a bad attitude on their part. The situation just eventually wore them out. 

jim and nina

 

 

Edited by JimAndNena
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Spent a month recently in Medellin. The lights never even flickered. Makes you wonder. (BTW it was rainy season with lightning and thunder). This part of the infrastructure is private in Chiriqui. Makes my wonder why such crappy service.

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What Jim and Nena said has merit.  Expectations.  One would think that power would be a constant.  The situation might just get worse if growth continues with consumption of power ever increasing in this country.  Dependence upon rain from the sky to power the hydo is another. Climates could change.  I guess the constant is expectation that anything could change...and will.  Nothing is constant. So the ability to go with the flow is the bottom line...anywhere. Some things we can not change and we should not expect to . Some things we can in fact assist in changing....but that is limited as well.  What comes to mind is so many of the volunteer charities that have blossomed here in Boquete.  That's a positive change happening.

Sounds sorta like the Serenity Prayer ( ha ha ha)

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Brundageba said:

What Jim and Nena said has merit.  Expectations.  One would think that power would be a constant.  The situation might just get worse if growth continues with consumption of power ever increasing in this country.  Dependence upon rain from the sky to power the hydo is another. Climates could change.  I guess the constant is expectation that anything could change...and will.  Nothing is constant. So the ability to go with the flow is the bottom line...anywhere. Some things we can not change and we should not expect to . Some things we can in fact assist in changing....but that is limited as well.  What comes to mind is so many of the volunteer charities that have blossomed here in Boquete.  That's a positive change happening.

Sounds sorta like the Serenity Prayer ( ha ha ha)

My quest is for serenity, preach on, sister! :-)

Boquete as the number one retirement destination started it all. EVERYBODY knows what a retirement community is like, even if they have never seen one. Retired people want activities but also want everything handled for them (vast generalization, I know, but so is #1 retirement community). That ain't Boquete. You can apply all the lipstick you want, it is still a pig.

That being said, it is THE getaway place for the country, especially those from Panama City. As a tourist stop it is worth the trip. It is living there full-time that wears one out.

jim

Edited by JimAndNena

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worn out.....  Well Bill and I are not yet even close to worn out living in Boquete.  There have been bumps in the road, and a few potholes but now we tend to watch for them coming and swerve.

BTW....some folks pay big money for "worn out".  And, I think we could get worn out in the USA too...it would just cost us more. (like those worn out jeans there)

12237086_1.jpg

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, JimAndNena said:

My quest is for serenity, preach on, sister! :-)

Boquete as the number one retirement destination started it all. EVERYBODY knows what a retirement community is like, even if they have never seen one. Retired people want activities but also want everything handled for them (vast generalization, I know, but so is #1 retirement community). That ain't Boquete. You can apply all the lipstick you want, it is still a pig.

That being said, it is THE getaway place for the country, especially those from Panama City. As a tourist stop it is worth the trip. It is living there full-time that wears one out.

jim

5942f3ec6fa14_Serenitynow.jpg.4108e0d90f7d2f69d2c0bf6020a33be1.jpg

Edited by JudyS
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3 hours ago, Brundageba said:

worn out.....  Well Bill and I are not yet even close to worn out living in Boquete.  There have been bumps in the road, and a few potholes but now we tend to watch for them coming and swerve.

BTW....some folks pay big money for "worn out".  And, I think we could get worn out in the USA too...it would just cost us more. (like those worn out jeans there)

12237086_1.jpg

Have I gotta deal for you!  2 bucks a pair, all you can carry.  And the pre-washed treatment is already there.

https://familythriftcenter.com/store-locations/

jim

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Posted (edited)
On 6/15/2017 at 9:37 AM, JimAndNena said:

Boquete as the number one retirement destination started it all. EVERYBODY knows what a retirement community is like, even if they have never seen one. Retired people want activities but also want everything handled for them (vast generalization, I know, but so is #1 retirement community). That ain't Boquete. You can apply all the lipstick you want, it is still a pig.

That being said, it is THE getaway place for the country, especially those from Panama City. As a tourist stop it is worth the trip. It is living there full-time that wears one out.

As someone who is in the process of relocating to Boquete, I wonder when you were in the "north country" last.  In my city, in the Northeast US, there is broken glass, heroin needles, beer bottles, and trash all over the streets, even in nice neighborhoods.  I just didn't see that in Boquete.  In lovely, touristy New England, we have power outages, crime, gun violence, regular sewer main collapses (most were installed in the 1800's), epidemic opioid addiction, homelessness, and bitter partisan political hatred. To quote JimAndNena, "you can apply all the lipstick you want, it is still a pig."  I guess I prefer the Panamanian variety, and am eager to adapt, adjust, learn, and contribute to a small community in meaningful ways.  Will Boquete be perfect?  That's the wrong question to ask.  It is what it is.  We are all free to make choices.

Edited by Admin_01
Correcting formatting issues

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Yo heart.jpg.a08507c14b8e046a9d6b29400032197e.jpgBoquete

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On 6/14/2017 at 4:45 PM, JohnF13 said:

I don't think it has anything to do with location.  It's more a function of a person's ability to adapt.  Those that make it here could probably make it anywhere ( mas o menos) because they have an innate ability to adapt and enjoy.  Doesn't matter where you are ( well, OK, for me the primary demand is no snow!) if you have the mindset, you will be fine.  I'm here and happy, but I'd be just as happy in Singapore.

I agree with your post entirely, John--including the part about no show!

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