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Grafted Hass Avocado Tree

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Looking to buy a Grafted Hass Avocado Tree. Any suggestions as to where?

Thanks!

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I would check with Betty Gray at Gray River Farms.  I am not sure if she grafts them but I know she has quite a few that are growing fast.

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I bought one from Gray River Farms at the monthly flea market two years ago.  It was grafted, but, alas, it didn't survive.  I'm not sure why.

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16 minutes ago, Woody said:

I bought one from Gray River Farms at the monthly flea market two years ago.  It was grafted, but, alas, it didn't survive.  I'm not sure why.

I had the same problem, as did another friend of mine.

 

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While I would not normally recommend this, a friend here in Volcan has grown a couple trees from Hass seeds. Kind of a crap shoot, but he claims the fruit from said trees is remarkably similar to that from his Hass clonal trees. Also, if I remember right, he claims to have gotten fruit from these seedlings after only 3-4 years. Might be worth a try.

 

 

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BTW, avocado trees need excellent drainage. That and the selection of appropriate root stock may be key factors for success in growing these.

 

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Avocado Trees

Any time one chooses to grow  a plant outside it's native zone, one takes

a chance.  If you prefer production over a particular flavor, then stick to whatever variety is commonly grown in the climate you live in.

 

The Hass avocado was born in California along the coast, so that is the best climate for the tree.  Panama's rainy season can be a problem!  When you dig the hole for the tree, make it double wide and  when you replace the soil around the tree, make sure that it is at least 1/3rd sand.   

 

Remember that the california soil is volcanic and sandy.  While avocados like sufficient water, they need very good drainage.  Planting on a slight slope is probably a good idea.  The article below takes up the topic well.

or

How to Care for Hass Avocado Trees

By Dale Devries; Updated September 21, 2017

There are over 500 varieties of avocados grown and the Hass is the most common now in the United States.. They have a dark green, almost black skin when ripe that is easily peeled to reveal the smooth green fruit. Care for these trees is minimal and the trees start bearing fruit as early as their second year. The root systems are quite extensive and will kill other plants within 20 feet of the tree.

 

Water the tree, soaking the soil, and wait until the top of the soil is dry before watering again. The frequency will depend on the weather. Hot dry air may cause you to water every day, while you may not need to water at all during a rainy season.

 

Place a top dressing of compost on the soil over the roots in the spring and summer of the first year. This will create a better draining soil plus place nutrients into the soil while the tree is too young for fertilizer.

Apply a 2-inch deep layer of mulch over the soil in a 2-foot diameter around the trunk of the tree in the spring. Keep the mulch at least 6 inches away from the trunk itself. The mulch will not only help to retain moisture but will also keep the area weed and grass free.

Begin to fertilize the tree in the second spring. Use a balanced fruit-tree fertilizer and apply in spring, early summer, late summer and late winter.  Spray the tree with a chelated foliar spray of trace elements containing iron if the tree has yellow leaves. This is an iron deficiency that is common among avocado trees and is easily corrected.

 

(Roher, up the street from Romero's, has some excellent foliar sprays.)  Please always feel free to ask questions.  I

want your tree to produce!

grayriverfarms@yahoo.com

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Hass avocados most likely are of Guatemalan origin. Most of these Guatemalan trees are found growing above 3,000 feet elevation. I've bought several from the "Tico" store here in Volcan. One died, several others, planted with more care are doing well. Interesting paper on Guatemalan avocados from about a hundred years ago:

http://www.avocadosource.com/CAS_Yearbooks/CAS_03_1917/CAS_1917_PG_104-138.pdf

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