74 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Panama Hardens Policies to Prevent Irregular Migration

AFP

| 16 mar 2017 08.17pm

Foreigners living in Panama as tourists must leave the country for a month if they want to reenter Panamanian territory, in addition to other restrictions on immigration, announced on Thursday the director of Migration, Javier Carrillo.

The new measure applies to foreigners who reside in the country as tourists, who when carrying more than five months, should leave Panama for at least a month If thhey want to re-enter, explained the official.

"This is for those who have more than five months in the country as tourists and leaving for nothing more than to return to re- enter. Now you have to be 30 days outside the country," said Carrillo to AFP.

Panamanian law provides that foreigners with tourist visa have a limit of six months of continued stay in the country.

But once that term is drawing to an end, many cross to Costa Rica with the objective that in their passports the exit stamp of Panama and return to Panamanian territory.

"The difference now is that if you come out with six months will not be permitted entry because people must go regularize status, nobody can be a tourist permanently," said Carrillo.

According to the official this measure does not affect tourists who spent a short period of time in the country and re-enter at a later date.

Data from the National Migration Service of Panama indicate that since 2010 there have been more than 100,000 requests for residence in the country, mainly of Venezuelans, Colombians, Spaniards, Estadosunidenses and Dominicans.

A high economic growth close to 5%, a dollarized economy, climate and a relative social peace have made Panama attractive to workers and retirees from other countries.

The measure is in addition to another taken at the beginning of the year when Panama eliminated the possibility of entry to foreigners with visas in the European Union.

With this, Panama was intended to prevent citizens from more than 50 countries to which restricts the entry, such as Cuba, China, Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, North Korea, Syria, Somalia, Nigeria and Algeria, take advantage of a European visa to enter.

"They are nationalities that had a restricted type of visa in Panama and to continue with that process what we have done is to revise the policy toward these countries," said the Minister of Safety and Security, Alexis Bethancourt.

Carrillo ruled out that the immigration policy of Panama has any relation with the plans of the president of the United States, Donald Trump, to limit the arrival of migrants to that country from Central America.

http://www.telemetro.com/nacionales/Panama-endurece-politicas-migracion-irregular_0_1008500192.html

Edited by Keith Woolford
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a good policy.i agree with it,one of the problems facing Europe right now.people enter as tourist and stay for ever.but it's always had a large amount of grey areas and weird loopholes.so does Panama.

I have a corporation.a business licence.ruk no.my children went to school here all done legally.i paid over 15000 dollars to seguro sociale.but never got residence due to various things.i was never illegal.but fell foul of a system operating a huge grey area.this should be a great example of a flawed system and Some one caught in it.i don't want sympathy .I just want to navigate my way through the grey areas and get out of it.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I am considering Spain as an alternative.  Until I sell my house in Florida, I cannot afford 2K to get my pensionado.  There are also retirees out there that do not have fingerprints.  Everyone's situation is different.  The Ambassador told us in his meeting that there are approximately 4500 expats in the Boquete area and, if everyone of those expats spends a minimum of $1,000 per month (there are a lot of us who spend more) you are looking at $4,500,000 dollars per month in this area alone.  If we all left, it would cripple the local economy.  Not to mention the charitable work we do here would be missed.  Why is Panama ignoring the contributions of the retirees?  To me it is obvious they do not want us here.

Edited by MarieElaine
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MarieElaine said:

I am considering Spain as an alternative.  Until I sell my house in Florida, I cannot afford 2K to get my pensionado.  There are also retirees out there that do not have fingerprints.  Everyone's situation is different.  The Ambassador told us in his meeting that there are approximately 4500 expats in the Boquete area and, if everyone of those expats spends a minimum of $1,000 per month (there are a lot of us who spend more) you are looking at $4,500,000 dollars per month in this area alone.  If we all left, it would cripple the local economy.  Not to mention the charitable work we do here would be missed.  Why is Panama ignoring the contributions of the retirees?  To me it is obvious they do not want us here.

I think Spain will be good for you.   A nice place to be.  It is in Europe.  A lot of history there.  Every place you set your foot has a recorded history way back to more than 2000 years.

Panama has a lot of retirees and will welcome all of them.  The only thing they have to do is comply with all the requisites, regulations and laws and thats it.  Easy.  I am so sure that more than 75% of the Expats in Boquete are legal and did all the stuff they have to do to live here peacefully and quietly.   Is that to much to ask??  Is that very difficult to understand??  Panama will be accepting expats for many years and will welcome all of them but legally.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Rooikop said:

It's a good policy.i agree with it,one of the problems facing Europe right now.people enter as tourist and stay for ever.but it's always had a large amount of grey areas and weird loopholes.so does Panama.

I have a corporation.a business licence.ruk no.my children went to school here all done legally.i paid over 15000 dollars to seguro sociale.but never got residence due to various things.i was never illegal.but fell foul of a system operating a huge grey area.this should be a great example of a flawed system and Some one caught in it.i don't want sympathy .I just want to navigate my way through the grey areas and get out of it.

You will not find here a solution for your immigrations problems.   I think that you should look for legal advice with one of the good, honest, reliable and affordable lawyers a lot of expats round here have used succesfully and without any complain.   With their guidance you could go step by step doing what is required and get a legal immigration status.  You wont be the first or the last.  Thousands people have done it before and are enjoying their stay in this little country.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We tend to forget the difference between TOURIST and RESIDENT or IMMIGRANTS.   They are not the same.   Different types of persons.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Keith Woolford said:

Maybe Bud can embed it

 

global-immigration-map.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Keith Woolford said:

Maybe Bud can embed it

Here's a more clearer one.

global immigration map 2.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Roger B said:

I think Spain will be good for you.   A nice place to be.  It is in Europe.  A lot of history there.  Every place you set your foot has a recorded history way back to more than 2000 years.

Panama has a lot of retirees and will welcome all of them.  The only thing they have to do is comply with all the requisites, regulations and laws and thats it.  Easy.  I am so sure that more than 75% of the Expats in Boquete are legal and did all the stuff they have to do to live here peacefully and quietly.   Is that to much to ask??  Is that very difficult to understand??  Panama will be accepting expats for many years and will welcome all of them but legally.

Agree 100% with you. Roger B.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Siempre. You saved me some time.

If you look at the map on their website, it is not a static display as shown here. Interesting. I just wonder where they get the underlying information to make such a chart.

My interpretation is that the Middle East, Europe and SE Asia are more active with migration as compared to the Americas. Others may see things differently, however.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Keith Woolford said:

Maybe Bud can embed it

Below is the interactive version of the migration map that Keith posted.

Quote

All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map

June 29, 2016

This map shows the estimated net immigration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.

Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people.

Country-to-country net migration (2010-2015)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Siempre Soluciones said:

Here's a more clearer one.

global immigration map 2.jpg

Who published this map? It certainly seems unrealistic that Australia, the U.S., and central Europe are the only migratory destinations noted.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Admin_01 said:

Interesting. I just wonder where they get the underlying information to make such a chart.

thanks for getting the interactive feature working, Bud.

Credit

The data for this map comes from the UN Population Division’s estimates for Total Migrant Stock — the number of global migrants, broken down by country of residence and country of origin. The numbers are not fully consistent. In some cases, they represent foreign citizens and in others they represent foreign born. See the dataset itself for the full set of footnotes.

To convert those figures into immigration estimates, I took the difference between the migrant stock in 2015 and that in 2010. Since some of that difference is due to mortality, not immigration, I adjusted the 2010 numbers down assuming an annual mortality rate of 0.8%, the global average.

The map was made in Javascript using D3, three.js, and MapboxGL.

Max Galka

I'm an NYC-based entrepreneur (my newest project: Blueshift). I'm fascinated by data visualization and the ways that data is transforming our understanding of the world. I spend a lot of time with my face buried in Excel, and when I find something interesting I write about it
Edited by Keith Woolford
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Keith Woolford said:

thanks for getting the interactive feature working, Bud.

<snip...>

De nada.

It is a cool "map". I would have used the word "chart" to describe what was being displayed, but that website specifically labels it a "map". Oh well, so much for my naval training.

It turns out that the only way to post the interactive version (given my current level of knowledge) is to use HTML code. That is something that only admins are permitted to do here on CL because it is very easy to destroy a website by using those powerful tools. Damage to a website can be either unintentional (e.g., simply making a typo), or intentional (the so-called bad dudes/dudettes). Most people do not think about those issues, but website owners have to protect their websites. So far in CL's life we have had about 30 attempts to hack CL, mostly from Russia, but one in particular from an African country. That is more than once a month. Such is life nowadays.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Keith Woolford said:

Who published this map? It certainly seems unrealistic that Australia, the U.S., and central Europe are the only migratory destinations noted.

The ABA Journal.

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 4.41.25 AM.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Keith Woolford said:

Global migration is at a peak. People are on the move everywhere and it's unfortunate you got caught here in the solution to a different problem.

http://metrocosm.com/global-migration-map.html

My bad.  Here's the video converted to GIF format in three parts:

Mapping_the_World_s_Immigration_Flows_Country_by_Country part 1.gif

Mapping_the_World_s_Immigration_Flows_Country_by_Country part 2.gif

Mapping_the_World_s_Immigration_Flows_Country_by_Country part 3.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Panama “permanent” tourist era ending

IMMIGATION-620x264.jpg

PERMANENT TOURISTS in Panama will soon be a thing of the past according to new immigration regulations.

Foreigners  living in Panama as tourists will no longer be  able to pop across the border to Costa Rica to get  their passports stamped with an exit visa but will have to leave the country for a month if they want to re-­enter Panamanian territory

The  move is in addition to other immigration restrictions announced by Migration Director Javier Carrillo The new measure applies to foreigners residing in the country as tourists. When they have reached five months living in the country, they must leave for at least one month if they want to re­enter, Carrillo  told AFP.

Panamanian law establishes that foreigners with a tourist visa have a limit of six months of continuous stay in the country. But once that deadline nears  completion, many crossed briefly to Costa Rica with so their passports showed the exit stamp from Panama They would then re­enter Panama, and be allowed to stay another six months.

“The difference now is that if they leave with six months they will not be allowed to enter because people should be regularized, no one can be a tourist permanently,” said Carrillo.

The  measure will not affect a tourist who is in Panama for a brief period of time and then re­enters.

 

http://www.newsroompanama.com/news/panama/panama-permanent-tourist-era-ending

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if a tourist stays for the full 6 months, they must be out of Panama for 30 days before they can enter again? Or is that if you exit by the 5th month, and if you stay the complete 6 months you cannot enter again at all?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, SP87 said:

So if a tourist stays for the full 6 months, they must be out of Panama for 30 days before they can enter again? Or is that if you exit by the 5th month, and if you stay the complete 6 months you cannot enter again at all?

I don't understand either. How can you exit by the 5th month while at the same time staying for six months? Paragraphs two and three appear contradictory.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The solution to most of this would be to ask a visitor how long he has planned to visit Panama and mark the visa page accordingly.  Visas are to allow one to arrive at a port of entry; the official then decides the length of stay based on the visitor's answer to the official's question on the purpose of the visit.  Simply stamping 180 days of visit is the problem.

jim

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Bonnie said:

I don't understand either. How can you exit by the 5th month while at the same time staying for six months? Paragraphs two and three appear contradictory.

It would seem the "officials" don't have a clear understanding of the current law:

Carrillo detailed that this new measure "is for those who have more than
five months in the country as tourists and leave nothing more than to return to
get in. Now they have to be 30 days out of the country. "

Bottom line: 3 days out of Panama has become 30 days.

jim

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JimAndNena said:

It would seem the "officials" don't have a clear understanding of the current law:

Carrillo detailed that this new measure "is for those who have more than
five months in the country as tourists and leave nothing more than to return to
get in. Now they have to be 30 days out of the country. "

Bottom line: 3 days out of Panama has become 30 days.

jim

 

Yes, but it's still not clear when one has to leave, at what point he has overstayed.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

A tourist is a tourist not a resident – Varela

tourists.jpg

 PANAMA PRESIDENT, Juan Carlos Varela, said Saturday, March 18, that there will be no more using of tourism permits  to establish  residency in the country.

Varela pointed out that whoever arrives in Panama as tourist can do so  but if he or she wants to remain with relatives already in the country or has other plans they can do so  as long as they follow the parameters established by Panamanian law.

The president explained that “we cannot afford for the six-month tourist permit to be used to cross the border and then return, and stay here as if you  were a permanent resident”.

On Friday, Javier Carrillo the director of the National  Migration Service said  that foreigners living in Panama as tourists must, at the end of five months  leave the country for at least  a month if they want to re-enter Panamanian territory.

Carrillo said that the new measure “is for those who have more than five months in the country  as tourists and leave for  nothing more than to re-enter. Now they have to be out of the country for  at lest 30 days.

 

http://www.newsroompanama.com/news/panama/tourist-tourist-not-resident-varela

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now