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  1. 8 points
    Why Planet Telecom is NOT renewing its advertising with Boquete.ning. We were solicited last night by the owners of Boquete.ning to participate in an advertising program. As current advertisers, we were expecting this, as our ad is set to expire at the end of the year. My response to them was unequivocal, and with the backing of Planet Telecom's shareholders, we responded, both via email, and on ning itself. Needless to say, our response on ning was quickly removed, and I was... eventually banned from the site. This speaks volumes about JLM's intolerance for dissent, and their absolute desire to control the message at all costs. Here's what we responded: We have been following very closely the development of Boquete.ning under the new ownership and management. Thus far, we have seen a vibrant, interesting and useful resource turn into a platitudinous and vacuous forum where all content remotely critical of the changes is treated with immediate censorship and "disappearance" under the guise of moderation. It has become, in our minds, a virtual North Korea. The misguided and expedient efforts to mold the content of ning speak of a general disregard for ning's most precious asset - its contributing members. Good friends and clients have been banned, others silenced. These are people who have lived here many years, and have contributed richly to both local and expat life in Chiriqui. Moreover, the overall member attitudes towards ning has shifted from "the place to be" to the dustbin of cyber irrelevance, in the inglorious company of Panama-Guide.com, bananamarepublic and others . It is Voltaire who famously said, "Monsieur l’abbé, je déteste ce que vous écrivez, mais je donnerai ma vie pour que vous puissiez continuer à écrire." Sadly, JLM Foundation has failed to heed those eternal words - words which encompass our philosophy and values. Whenever our company was criticized on ning or elsewhere, we respond - not with a surreptitious call to Lee to have the critical posts deleted (the vulgarity of such a gesture would be unimaginable), but with our candid explanation and response. This has garnered the respect of the community - and of our clients. We sincerely believe the new administration bears the responsibility for this deterioration. The advertising asset known as ning, has in our estimation been significantly impaired to a point of no longer being a viable platform for Planet Telecom. Please remove our ad at the end of the term.
  2. 6 points
    I was asked to contribute to this discussion having experienced firsthand the difficulty in obtaining justice for crimes against perpetrators under the current Panamanian Legal System. Forgive me, this is a long post. I no longer live in Chiriqui but I do occasionally read CL -- after all, I did live in Potrerillos for 15 years. This post is not meant “to put the frighteners” on expats it is more to enlighten and hopefully to bring about realization of the “the way things are”. It is not written in anger, it is written partially to thank those who saved my life and those who supported me throughout my months in hospital and beyond. Strangely enough I do not harbor hatred against the two teens who assaulted me. If it wasn’t for the attack I would not be living where I am now. I exchanged the mountains for the beach and ocean and for the happiness that living only four minutes’ walk away from your only child can bring. But having said that, it is frightening to think that the two teenagers are now at liberty to commit armed robbery again and next time their victim may not survive. I lived in Panama for 15 years, maybe two or perhaps three years after we moved onto our property and into our home I experienced a robbery. This was when things were still tranquilo in this area, when crimes were only crimes of opportunity and when criminal violence was extremely rare. A very presentable man, with new(ish) bicycle came to my house to ask if I knew where a “gringo called Mike” lived. I told him I did not. Little did I know he had been “scoping out” the house through the windows and seen my wallet and cell phone on the kitchen island. He got back on his bike and that was that – or so I thought as I returned to what I was doing in the family room. Several hours later, searching for my phone, I realized it and my wallet, were missing. The robber had apparently returned, entered the kitchen and quickly taken my wallet and cell phone. My dog did not bark as she had seen me talking to the man outside and I suspect had classified him as “a friend”. I had a photo of the man, he had committed several robberies in the area including the home of one of my neighbors. The man lived in David and the David police knew him well from his criminal history. I spent hours at the Municipio in Dolega giving a denuncia. My gardener and a neighbor were also required to go to the Municipio to give statements. I was summoned to the PTJ in David to look through ancient mug shot albums – even though I had a photo of the felon!! People had seen the man catching the bus from David, Dolega and Potrerillos. They remembered him because his bike had been loaded on to the roofs of the buses at times consistent with the robbery. There was no follow up by the authorities, the man was never charged or prosecuted and I heard nothing more from the police. After my husband passed away, I decided to downsize and put my home on the market. A year before the home invasion I was contacted by “Andy Singer” who said he and his Panamanian wife were planning to return to Panama to open a bed and breakfast and that my property seemed ideal for such a purpose. He asked several questions and I directed him to the website for my home where all of his questions would be answered. “Andy Singer” then told me he would like to view my property and could I give him my phone number so he could call me to set up an appointment. Something in my feeble brain gave out a warning signal. I decided to wait 24 hours before responding. In the meantime I checked further, as far as my limited knowledge of technology would allow, and discovered that though the emails were signed Andy Singer, ploughing through all of the extraneous information of the email source I came upon the writer’s address of “Billinlacarcel@...” or Bill in Prison. Another possible future scam for Wild Bill and his then cell mate Ozzie?? Obviously, with funding from relatives and friends, they are able to buy smart phones/tablets to allow them to check out possible future victims, or perhaps this was their way of “having a little fun”. Prison wardens in Panama jails are not law enforcement officers but are hired from outside the prison system. They are open too bribes. If a prisoner has the cash they can obtain whatever they want. This is a well-known fact. I reported the email to Lt. Castillo, who, at that time was head of the police department for Boquete and Dolega and who I had known for many years. He said he would come to my home to verify the email, take printed copies with him and call his contact at the David jail. He never arrived at my home, neither did he send another police officer. There was no follow-up, nothing was ever done. Lt. Castillo retired from the police force several months later. How long has “Wild Bill” been in prison awaiting trial – four, five years? There has still been no trial and therefore no justice for the families of the victims. In defense of the police of Chiriqui (and in the country as a whole), their hands are somewhat tied by the laws of Panama and their interest in the community somewhat dulled by their frequent repostings. It is extremely difficult to form a relationship -- police with citizens or citizens and police -- when the length of assignment to a location is pitifully short. I had many friends/acquaintances among the police community of the Dolega District, they would frequently come to my home to check on my husband and I, sit and chat, have a soda and cookies but I soon learned that a policeman who you thought would be “first on the scene” if something happened to you, would soon be posted to a different town or city. Captain Roberto Espinoza, as Bud himself said “He could retire later this year, but no firm decision has been made at this juncture.” So, he may hold the position of Boquete Police Captain for a year or even less?? Not enough time to build relationships or form a sound knowledge of the community and the people who live in it. The local people are the ones who can help the most with leads and “inside information” which leads to an arrest. To give praise where praise is deserved, the police did catch two of the teenagers who attacked me. I don’t know how long it took, (I was aware of very little at the time), I think they were apprehended very quickly – but – the younger teenager, the one who stabbed me, was 14 years old and because the laws of Panama dictate that a person has to be 18 years old before they can be prosecuted, he received a slap on the hand and was released. Last I heard before I left Chiriqui, he was living with his father in the Boquete area. The second of my attackers, the one who shot me twice, I was told was 17. He was held for several months and the grapevine said that the police were hoping to keep him until his 18th birthday when he could be prosecuted. Now this is all “hearsay”, gleaned from police, translators, interviews, friends – I cannot swear that this is the truth. I have been told subsequent to my departure, that this young man has also been released. So to potential murderers are now back on the streets and living in the community. If these teenagers had tied me up and asked me where my wallet was, where the computer was, where my jewelry was – I would have readily told them but they broke into my house at 2:30 am, immediately stabbed and shot me without uttering one word and only questioned me while I was laying on the floor in a large pool of my own blood. They laughed as they walked down the driveway with their “haul”. They had stolen my cell phone so I couldn’t call for help, but fortunately that laughter I heard as they left made me angry, very angry and the adrenaline started flowing which enabled me to drive to a neighbor’s house, squeeze through a small space by the side of their gate and crawl up the driveway. My neighbor (a Panamanian so no language barrier) called the police and an ambulance. She called other neighbors who arrived in seconds -- the police responded quickly but my neighbors decided the ambulance was taking too long and loaded me into their truck to drive me to Mae Lewis. I owe my life to the Le Borgne’s, the Ferguson’s and the Kolm’s, it goes without saying to Dr. Cattan who performed the surgery and the care of Don Ray and Lilliam Williams after my release from hospital. Several weeks later, my doctor told me that the police had wanted to interview me while I was in Intensive Care when I was semi-comatose and with tubes inserted in every orifice – obviously I didn’t have enough orifices as the doctors had to create even more entry points for tubes. The police insisted on seeing me only to realize I was unable to hear or respond. However, as soon as I was able I was asked to give a statement -- two police detectives and a translator arrived by my bedside. I was released, after being in hospital for ten plus weeks and except for the last few days, with nursing care 24 hours per day. In early January I was required to attend an appointment with the government psychologist – I can only guess she was tasked with ascertaining if I was lying about the attack. Obviously, given the fragility of my appearance, the fact that walking was extremely difficult even with a walker, plus the surgical scar from breast bone to pubic bone, she determined that I had been the victim of a crime. Astute Lady!!??!! As JohnF13 said I was questioned two or three months prior to leaving Panama, I was also questions two other times, once more in the hospital and once while staying with Don Ray and Lilliam Williams. Each time was an ordeal for me, I had to relive the incident. Each time I felt as if I was the one under scrutiny and that there was doubt about the veracity of my story. I also received an “official document” requiring me to see a government doctor who would verify my medical condition. The letter received, which indicated I was to submit to an examination at a date and time to be notified, was dated incorrectly, December 2016 rather than December 2015. Apparently this caused a major malfunction in the machinery that drives the government offices involved in this case. Calls were made on my behalf several times and we made appearances at the appropriate offices twice to ask about the appointment for the examination. Each time we were told “you will be contacted when the doctor can schedule you”. I remained in the country until July 18th, 2016 over nine months after the attack. At no time was I nor the Williams contacted with a date and time for me to appear to be examined by the government doctor. My point is, that I was subjected to interviews and interrogations and psychological examinations at a time when my life and mental wellbeing hung in the balance – all for naught. The investigation team of the DJI was led by another officer I had known previously and who is also from Potrerillos, he had returned to the area after being posted to La Joya and Panama City for several years. He too had been to my home many times. The perpetrators were known, one was in custody, I presume there was evidence from fingerprints and leads on where they had disposed of my possessions (my computer was actually seen to be on-line) and yet I was never asked to identify the suspects either visually or from their voices. Visually I could not have done so, the violence happened too quickly and in the dark, I was then in pain and wallowing in my own blood, but I could have given a definite identification from their voices. I still hear those voices at 2:30 in the morning when I wake up in a cold sweat “¿Dónde está el dinero? Queremos más dinero, ¿dónde está?”. At no time was I requested by any member of the Policia Nacional nor the DJI if I would testify. At no time was it even suggested that the perpetrators would actually come to trial and that my testimony would be paramount in obtaining a conviction. At no time was I told I would be required to testify. At no time was I asked not to leave the country as my testimony would be necessary for the prosecution. In short, yes, the police appreciate brownies, I baked frequently for the police in Dolega and for the police who stopped by my house but, oatmeal cookies, butterscotch pie and brownies will only result in a happy smile from the recipients. The police are understaffed, underpaid and underfinanced. This leads to a lack of motivation to track down criminals or to put their lives at risk when they know full well that the laws of Panama negate any efforts they make to apprehend perpetrators of crime, however heinous the crime might be. The chance that criminals will see any prison time is slim to none. It’s fine to protect yourself, take all the precautions you can but the criminals are becoming smart. Do you have an automatic entry gate?? If not, perhaps you need one. Remember a couple of years ago there were one or two robberies when people were ambushed as they exited their cars to manually open their entry gates. They were then forced to open their homes and allow the robbers free rein. What is really sad is that the one person who could possibly have made a difference and fought for a change in the law and who initially headed protests and meetings, Diputada Athena Athanasiadis, diverted her interest to other, I can only assume, more deserving causes. Initially her anger was stirred and she became involved, I suspect, primarily because I lived only a two minute walk from her parents’ house, the home she was raised in. Her parents are definitely not “on a budget” and can pay for 24/7 security guards – I and most other retirees can not. Unless the law changes, violent crimes will continue to be committed and will escalate with little or no hope of retribution from the authorities on the perpetrators.
  3. 6 points
    Actually, still a lot of entertainment value here, as Olga desperately tries to present odd subjects, and a few of the remaining members respond with satirical offerings of their own - repeating Olga's ridicules line; "You must read and comment on this". Hahaha.....Richard Simmons, indeed....lol.....
  4. 6 points
    I recently became aware of the following article by Eric Jackson on his Panama English News site. I am posting it here not to provoke a conflagration or to disparage particular persons but because it is a historically based, provocative perspective on how certain types of expatriates have affected and potentially could affect this country. OPINION - Eric JacksonColonization: a touchy subject that Panama should not just ignoreIn collaboration with some Panamanian law firms, “offshore asset protection” outfits and real estate salespeople, plus another American named Daniel Daves, Wiles has prompted a migration to Boquete of Americans who believe in these primitive sorts of hatreds and are prepared to evade the immigration, labor and weapons laws of the Republic of Panama. Quotations by Rick Wiles, graphic by The Advocate. October 20, 2015 (The Panama News) By Eric Jackson Take the Wayback Machine to Panama City in 1856, when the California Gold Rush was still underway, the Dred Scott case was percolating in the American courts toward the next year’s decision that would do so much to provoke a bloody civil war, and this gringo named Jack Oliver thought it appropriate to steal from an Afro-Panamanian fruit vendor, and to introduce a gun into the argument when the vendor objected. Dozens of people, mostly Americans, were killed and the first of several US military invasions of Panama ensued. Fast forward to 2014. This gringo named Sage Million was one of the “sovereign citizens” who colonized the El Volcan area. The sovereign citizens have many variations on a rap that began with a white supremacist group that calls itself the Posse Comitatus (not to be confused with a US law of that name). That routine originally went that because the rebellious states of the old Confederacy were obliged to adopt state constitutions that ratified the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the US Constitution as a prerequisite for readmission to the Union, those amendments and all US constitutional changes that came thereafter, and the very existence of the federal government. and the things that it does and has done, are illegitimate, null and void. Consider that the 13th Amendment abolished slavery to know how reactionary that is. Consider that the 14th Amendment provides among other things that every person born in the United States is a US citizen to know how reactionary Donald Trump is. But there are other strains of sovereign citizens who say that it wasn’t until the 17th Amendment in 1913, which provides for direct election of US senators, or the 1934 Gold Reserve Act, that the national government became “unconstitutional.” In any case, the sovereign citizen rap is that by the time that Hawaii became a state in 1959 everything that the US federal government did was illegitimate. That being so, Mr. Million figured, Hawaiian statehood and Hawaii’s state laws are illegitimate, ESPECIALLY the one giving rise to the warrant for his arrest for allegedly having sexual relations with a 10-year-old girl. He also considered himself so personally sovereign that Panamanian and Costa Rican borders didn’t apply to him. In the course of an illegal border crossing Panama’s SENAFRONT arrested him and the US embassy notified Panama of the state warrant for his arrest. Just one short-eye perv who’s a bit crazier than most? Well, that too, but Sage Million had both open and silent supporters in the gringo community here. That’s scary, because some modern-day Jack Oliver who considers that young cholas have no rights that a white gringo is bound to respect could rather quickly inflame the deadliest of passions. A mob enraged about something like that may not inquire about what sort of American they would be attacking, especially if the ultra-right element of the gringo community shoves its way in front of the TV cameras and represents itself as the voice of all Americans here. So is it just a matter for amusement when dozens of American families heed a call by Rick Wiles and Daniel Daves to drop everything in the USA and head to Panama, and then they start to show up in Boquete? Consider that they are not just urging senior citizens to come retire here. Many of the people who have come to Boquete due to the urging of Wiles and Daves are working age Americans who are not millionaires and won’t qualify for pensionado, investor or special professional visas. They are coming here intending to violate Panamanian labor and immigration laws. And what about the advice that Daves gives his followers about protecting themselves? He not only says that every “Christian” of his variety ought to be packing a gun, he’s advising people to get portable anti-aircraft weapons to shoot down drones. Panama is conflicted about gun policies at the moment, and perhaps our Security Minister Rodolfo Aguilera is so far off the deep end as to like the idea of foreigners who are illegally here carrying surface-to-air weapons around. Were the National Police interested in a military coup, that sort of thinking around the cabinet table would be a readily available excuse. But although I think that Aguilera gets his information from Hollywood fiction to an extent unacceptable in a Panamanian government minister, I don’t think he’s for gringo fanatics going around Panama armed with weapons of war. But hey — just because Panamanian law provides that preaching ethnic, political, racial or religious hatred is a deportable offense if a foreigner does it, our gay, lesbian and transgendered citizens are “fair game” here. In Panama it’s “legal” to hate queers. Plus, one of the questions that is not looked into during this country’s immigration procedures is whether the applicant suffers from paranoid delusions. Set aside all of the creepy xenophobia that comes from legislator Zulay Rodríguez’s mouth — but all resident gringos should be aware of the threat that it represents in the presence of American extremists in Panama. And for those of us who are citizens, whether or not duals like me, there is a duty to Panama’s sovereignty — not only from hostile nations but also from individuals who consider themselves to be sovereign powers superior to the Panamanian people and to the flawed republic that happens to be the only one we have. Balance those things against the universal human right to believe in whatever stupid thing that you want to believe. It’s not the first occasion for Panama to balance such considerations. But I think that if Wiles or Daves are found in this country, they should be arrested for illicit association to violate a number of Panamanian laws, and that all of their followers who have come here or seek to come here should be carefully examined on an individual basis. Panama really needs a better defined and more consistent policy about these sorts of colonizations.
  5. 5 points
    As I write this, I am shaking my head. Another site hacked, this time one that hold passwords for thousands of people. What I am commenting on is a service called One Login. It is a password manager service. The idea is to keep all of your passwords in one place and have a program or app on your phone keep track of them so they can all be very long and different. You only need to remember the one password for the service and the rest is done for you. Well, OneLogin was broken into by hackers and all of the passwords, including the keys to unencrypt them, were exposed. If you have this service, you have already received an email about it. For the people that do not have that particular password manager but do use a similar service I would like to caution you with a bit of reasoning. The old saying is "Don't put all your eggs in one basket". A password manager does exactly that. It puts everything valuable in one place. You are then trusting some company to keep the passwords to all your valuable information safe. Consider this... if you are a hacker, it would make sense to attack the place where there are hundreds if not thousands of passwords rather than trying to get just one password of yours. Personally, I solve the problem of having different passwords on different sites by making a formula out of them. It is a rule that I apply to each website when they want me to create a password. If follow the rule, then each site then gets a unique password. I do not need to remember the password, instead I can recreate in my mind by remembering the simple rule. Here are a few examples: Let's say this is my formula to make a password for any web site I visit: First two letters of each word of the website name, followed by the year I was born, followed by a $ and then my initials in lower case Wells Fargo = WeFa56$DP Ebay = Eb56$DP Chiriqui Life = ChLi56$DP As you can see you end up with both upper and lower case letters, numbers, and a special character ($). That meets all the recommendations and it is unique for each website. Now when I visit in the future, I just think the rule out and I can figure out my password without having it written down or stored in a password manager. You can add other things and mix it with your own variations to make your formula unique. Perhaps you want to use the first initial of all your kids names or maybe the last two letters of the website name. The idea is to create a simple rule that lets you create a password for each site and makes it unique. Keep the rule the same for every site and it will have enough variations to make a different password each time. By doing this, you no longer need the password manager service and all of your accounts will not suddenly be exposed with a single failure should it get hacked. It is something to consider. I have always said a password manager works right up until the company disappears or gets hacked. When that happens, you do not have to deal with a single exposure, you have to deal with EVERY site. In today's world, that can easily be 100s. Now... about saving the passwords in your web browser so you do not have to enter them each time - I will let you consider the risks when your computer goes into the shop for repair ! Stay safe and enjoy the day
  6. 5 points
    I invite you all to take a look at this link from Best Places in the World to Retire: https://bestplacesintheworldtoretire.com/stories?view=entry&id=328 This is a come-on article, advertising that health insurance for tourists is free. This hasn't been true for over two and a half years. Only at the end of the article is there an "editor's note" that this insurance is no longer available. If you were honestly trying to disseminate information helpful to persons thinking about visiting or retiring to Panama, as all these sites represent, why would you publish an article with out-of-date facts? Of what possible good, I ask, is this information inasmuch as it no longer applies? I've said it before, and I'll say it again: what these folks do to make a buck is unconscionable.
  7. 5 points
    The problem is that Panama has not made any clear cut rules, it is all very wishy washy. The best way at this point is to hear about others experiences crossing the border, either by land or air. People have been attacked trying to tell their experiences, and that has shied people away from telling their stories. Maybe if this stops we can gain some insight. It has been said before 5 months have passed to stay out 30 days and you will be let back in, but if you reach your 6th month staying out for 30 days won't let you back in. If that is the case when can you come back, 6 months, a year? No one knows. It has also been said that if you have been border hopping for 2 years, you can't come back in. If so, how long before you can come back? It has also been said that if you are in the process of applying for residency to show a letter or paperwork from your lawyer and you will be let back in, but will you really be able to, is this good enough? Hopefully some will come forward and tell their experiences so others can benefit. If you have been border hopping for awhile at this point if I were to do a border hop, I would treat it as if I wouldn't be allowed back in just in case. Have someone caring for your pets, let your landlord know you may not be able to come back, maybe go so far as packing up all of your things or selling them.
  8. 5 points

    until

    Marcelyn and I were participants in ARF's Thanksgiving Day event at the Animales Building. There was a LOT of VERY GOOD food, great conversations, visits with friends, etc. We estimate there were about 70 guests and maybe 15 worker-bees taking care of setting up, tending to the guests, etc. The background music was nice, and not so loud as to intrude into the conversations. The pecan pie was simply outstanding. Kudos to that chef! But I also do not want to take away from any of the other food items. I sampled all the food choices, and there was nothing to apologize for on that front. An unexpected plus for us was that we finally got to meet Beth Abrahams (it is kind of a long story, don't ask). Beth Abrahams We also got to catch up with all of the latest travels and happenings of our friends who were at our table. Met a few new people, etc. There simply was nothing that we could fault (not our goal anyway). This is the way things should be done, and ARF did it with all of their wonderful volunteers. If someone found fault with something yesterday, then I would chalk them off as being a token curmudgeon. Thank you ARF! GREAT JOB!!!! Thank you to all who helped make yesterday's Thanksgiving Day celebration such a huge success, and special thanks to N&N: I will close with: we all have a lot to be thankful for.
  9. 5 points
    Danielle It is interesting your response. My age and experience let me understand peoples writting because it reflects, in most of the cases, the way the person thinks. First. I would like that you send me only one, just one proof, that I posted a disrespectful comment of anybody here, on Boquete.Ning or any other forum. So if you dont know me you cant talk about me. So this is the first lie you are writting and implying. I am not an expat. That is right. I am not living in Boquete, that is right. But I am a panamanian citizen and this is my country so I think that I cant participate in any forum I would like. You dont know. You dont know if I have family living in Chiriqui. You dont know if I have family or relatives living in Boquete. If you can read you should notice that most of my posting have the goal of helping expats living in this, my imperfect country, how to understand things, procedures, culture, customs, laws, etc. So I dont think that you are the person who has a right to disqualify me to post and participate in this forum that is located in my country. In my more than 4 years of being posting in Boquete and Chiriqui forums I have always received good words of the owners of the forums. I did exchange calls and personal email with Lee Seltzer. I know PERSONALLY the owner of this forum. So I am sorry if you dont like me be around because you are disqualifying me to be here.
  10. 5 points
    What I like about this is that I see the community very well interested in the project and participating actively with the authorities when a concern and doubts arise. People have become the Project's inspector. That is good. It is the way to address any problem that could affect the good performance of the project in the future. The contractor is aware that people are concerned and vigilant of the work they are doing. All of you keep doing it. I have seen in other parts of Panama that people do not participate in checking the projects and denouncing anything bad happening and then start complaining when the job is finished and very difficult to address the problem. Good Job!!
  11. 5 points
    My husband died in Hospital Chiriqui on June 22, 2016. Fortunately, I had attended the class sponsored by Boquete Hospice and Heath Care Foundation on the subject of how to prepare for death in Panama so as to satisfy government requirements and facilitate arrangements required of one's next of kin or designated representative. On the whole, the procedures are as outlined by Hospice, and I encourage everyone who has not already to retrieve the various forms from the Hospice website [www. boquetehospice.org/ ], complete them, and put them where they are available to whoever will be handling your affairs following your passing. I will concentrate in this post on procedures I found to be somewhat different from the advice given by Hospice and on those which I found to be extraordinarily important. The importance of having a "living will" cannot be overstated. My husband was hospitalized for 16 days, in and out of intensive care. On day 12 or thereabouts, he was moved from intensive care back to his room in a regular ward, and the doctor informed me that all his organs were failing and that he would not recover. Nevertheless, he was hooked up to a ventilator, and kidney dialysis was scheduled for later that day. He was on intravenous morphine and was unconscious, and had been for several days. I produced his living will, the doctor perused it carefully and checked with hospital administration/legal. The hospital agreed to honor it. My husband died peacefully--still unconscious and still on morphine--four days later. Gracias a Dios, I had gone to trouble and expense of having living wills for both of us drawn up by our lawyer less than a year previously. It is my understanding that only living wills that are in Spanish and that are executed by a lawyer--with all the appropriate embossing, stamps, and signatures--are honored by the Panama medical community. Don't put this off, and, however tight your budget may be, find the money in it to pay for this important document. I found the Hospice written materials somewhat unclear about two documents required for the funeral home and the Electoral Tribunal. The funeral home will issue the death certificate, but only upon the presentation of a different certificate or declaration of death issued by the attending physician. Sometimes, I understand, the doctor himself will deliver this declaration to the funeral home, particularly in Boquete. In my case, where the death was in a hospital in David, I was responsible for getting this declaration from the doctor and taking it with me to the funeral home. Perhaps routinely or perhaps fortunately, my doctor had it prepared and waiting for me at the nurse's station in the hospital. I took it, as well as other paperwork recommended by Hospice, to the funeral home (Funeraria del Retiro, in my case), where I graciously was met by Pedro Gonzalez, my insurance agent, who served as translator and witness. (My son also was with me, but he was ineligible to service as a witness because he is not a resident of Panama.) I paid for the services of the funeral home, the cremation, and copies of the death certificate (in cash), signed some papers, and was on my way in just over 30 minutes. The funeral home handled all the paperwork with the Tribunal Electoral, so these steps as outlined by Hospice were unnecessary. After I reported the death to the U.S. Embassy in Panama City, the Embassy sent me multiple copies of a document entitled "Report of the Death of an American Citizen Abroad." This is invaluable when dealing the entities in the U.S. (insurance companies, banks, credit card companies, etc.) because it is in English. The Embassy took the necessary steps to stop social security payments. Finally, I would like to put in a plug for having maximum insurance coverage. I never saw the bill (and don't want to) because my insurance paid it in full directly to the hospital. It had to have been enormous, particularly since my husband spent so much time in intensive care. As an example, I noted on the bottle of morphine that it costs $500, and I'm sure he received more than one bottle intravenously over a 24-hour period, and he received morphine for at least 12 days. It's my understanding that the public hospital does not provide morphine free of charge, so without adequate insurance or cash reserves, a patient may undergo substantial suffering. The care at Hospital Chiriqui was excellent, particularly in intensive care, and the two doctors handling my husband's case were superb. They were available at any time, were communicative, were forthright, and were very caring. All of this relieved much of the burden that accompanies so emotionally draining an experience. In short, because we decided to make the financial sacrifice and purchase good health insurance, both my husband's suffering and my own were greatly ameliorated. I would be remiss if I didn't take this opportunity to thank the Boquete community for all of its support via phone calls, emails, and personal visits. And a special thanks goes to my friends who brought food to the house so that my son and I could return home to a good meal after a long, trying day at the hospital. I have endeavored to thank folks individually, but it's likely that someone was missed. So a heartfelt thanks to everyone for being so kind and supportive.
  12. 5 points
    Dear Bonnie, It strikes that one of the most important aspects of existence in life is a fundamental recognition of the simple fact that our time here on this beautiful earth is limited; that for each and every one of us, one journey ends, and the sendero to the next begins in a place we cannot know and will never fully understand. In my own reckoning, to pursue life and living is to pursue dignity and honor, and your actions and your words demonstrate the very essence of honor and dignity as you and your loved ones face the difficult realities of your beloved husband's passing. May I be so bold as to salute your grace and aplomb in this most trying of times, and may the strength of your character sustain you with ease and grace in those moments when you most need them. With deepest respect, Dav
  13. 5 points
    Dear People, I'm so sorry to have omitted important information, when posting news of Parmigiano's 35% discount for lunch dishes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, ending June 30, 2016. Beverages are not included in this offer. This offer cannot be combined with any other discount or offer. Parmigiano Restaurant is located in Boquete, diagonally across from Sugar and Spice, on the right side of the road, just after The Fish House, when leaving town and driving toward David. Conversely, it is approximately 300 meters after Hotel Fundadores, on the left, when entering Boquete, driving from David. I take full responsibility for this oversight. 'Twasn't Penny's doing or Parmigiano's, for that matter. I wrote the blurb and posted it. Thank you for your patience. Barbara Phillips, Alto Dorado, Boquete, Chiriqui, Panamá.
  14. 5 points
    Best Wishes at New Year's are generally directed at another person's health and prosperity, and I pass them on to all. Mine often include a word or two about all of humanity living in peace and harmony, and I pass those on to you, too. Perhaps not my best, but maybe one of my better wishes this year, is for less acrimonious and non-productive content to be posted by all members of the local online community. I'm passing that on as well.
  15. 5 points
    My thoughts were that the poster was simply doing a parody of the direction Ning had taken. He had another post about a guy who started dealing in marijuana to get enough money to buy his girlfriend a boob job. I might be wrong about it being parody, but I don't think so. I also think that Olga must be getting paid by the word. I pity her husband if the incessant babbling is her normal persona.
  16. 5 points
    Hey, this wouldn't be a real discussion without a counterpoint or two, so I will offer up some. Ahh, I can almost feel the negative reputation votes getting ready to smother my good name ;-) This topic peaked my curiosity so I checked Ning to catch up on the happenings there. For sure, that woman can talk and talk and talk and talk. I got a serious headache reading through all of it. But, then I realized that she's generating lots of discussion and I'm sure the hits on the site are going up again. And, even better, I could hardly find any juvenile comments from Ambreen or the the shills they were using in September and October to make happy happy happy time. So, I guess what I'm saying is that I think Olga is what the site needed to survive. She's got boundless energy and is stimulating a lot of discussion. It may be useless discussion, but nonetheless it's active. OK, I can't wait to see if my cumulative reputation will still be green when I wake up in the morning.
  17. 5 points
    Thanks Woody. Like I said in the intro, this is something we've been looking at for a long time. But when people like Fran Hogan, Don Ray Williams et al, are banned from the site for saying things that don't mesh with the owner's point of view, there's a problem. I've known Fran since I moved here in 2006, and I've read Don Ray since probably 2004-2005. These are reasonable people with only the best intentions in mind. Both have contributed greatly to well-being of the province. I understand that some online behaviour can become problematic, so I can sympathize with the challenge of moderation. Sadly, we need to have some level of control over the more outrageous expressions online. This is where a steady hand at the helm is necessary for people to feel comfortable in the forum - whilst encouraging free expression. In terms of our decision, we initially bought this ad as part of a Bid4Boquete auction, Lee had donated the ad space, and we bought it, with the $600 fee going to Bid4Boquete. Our feeling was therefore that JLM was not profiting financially from our advertising, so there was no major moral quandary for us. Having said that, the perception among users would be different - and that needed to be reconciled with the fact that we had paid for advertising, and were getting some value from it. I really appreciate your feedback, and your business.
  18. 4 points
    Thank you, Doug and Jo, for all your work on this Healthcare Resources program. I believe this information is helpful and at times very necessary when we have a medical problem. Good job!
  19. 4 points
    The newslady agrees that all persons submitting an email for distribution should identify themselves. She is working on a way to universally enforce this desire. Short of proof-reading, editing, and correcting every email that comes in, there doesn't seem to be a way to make people think about how to submit an informative, well written notice. Too many people dash off a couple of sentences on their smart phone and send it in to be put into almost 2000 email inboxes. Shows a disrespect for the service.
  20. 4 points
    Dear Chiriqui Lifers, I recently read a rather long and convoluted forum posting about something or other, and there was a lot of stuff in it, and some back-and-forth, and much "quoting", then followed by much "re-quoting", which was either construed or mis-construed, and then there was a bit of a rhubarb, with postings and ripostes, and it seemed as though some feathers were ruffled and a bit of fur flew, and there was the requisite "blah-blah-blah", and an imbroglio instigated investigation of intolerance, and civility was verging on civil war, with families and friendships torn akimbo and the very essence and stuff of life itself and all that is honorable and good and holy and treasured and revered and celebrated and valued was suddenly vulnerable and threatened and at-risk of being rent asunder .... ... and suddenly! -- our fearless Moderator stepped-in, and the entire thread was arrested and incarcerated and sentenced to the dust-bin of history, and roiled waters were calmed, and Mean Mr. Trouble was banished, and peace descended upon the land, and the "New Dawning of the Age of Chiriqui Life" commenced, and it was good. BUT! As a verified "Inexpert User" of this forum, I am compelled to take great personal offense at the following quote: "However, this topic is going awry." As the Founder, Chief Executive Officer, and Sole Member of the Official "wryawry Fan Club", I take great offense at the flippancy of the above quote, and this has "triggered" me, and now I shall be forced to retreat to my "safe space" in order to contemplate the grievous and egregious insult, and consult with my Legal Team in order to strategerize retribution and the likelihood of significant monetary redress. NOW THEREFORE: Let every Member of this Forum be put ON NOTICE that personal insults such as these WILL NOT BE TOLERATED and that AS OF THIS MOMENT this writer plots serious and profound REVENGE!!! You will all be severely punished with love, wryawry
  21. 4 points
  22. 4 points
    The question is ignorant and insulting. Who cares what the answer is.
  23. 4 points
    I think it is just human nature for one to find ways to justify difficult decisions and then vent to relieve the stress and frustration. I am one that is leaving Panama and while I could easily list a number of things I dislike or seemed senseless here in Panama, I am sure I could just as easily find faults in my new destination once I have lived there for an equal amount of time. All my life I have made a major move about once every 10 years and I could easily list faults and express frustration with each location. My personal decision to move on is based on what appears a better option both personally and financially. While Panama finally tipped the scale for me in a different direction and while some past experiences here in Panama played a part in predicting the future, I can't say I have any great displeasure with Panama as a whole. I could probably list just as many pros as cons. There are certainly things I will miss here and will likely be back to visit clients and friends. It does feels like there are a larger number of expats leaving at this time or at least a bit more than the normal turnover we have seen each year. I am very skeptical about how concerned Panama is about the number leaving the country. I am sure they are more concerned with other issues and the expats leaving is probably just a side effect of other policy decisions. If Panama teaches you anything, it is that everything changes constantly (both good & bad). It can change at a moments notice... or even with no notice at all. Rules and laws here seem to be only enforced when a situation becomes untenable. Typically enforcement is done for a short time and then, as with everything here, it changes again. Seemingly random and sometimes without good reason to those of us that are used to laws and regulations being hard and fast.
  24. 4 points
    Agree. That said, I didn't retire here to die early on the road. That was not part of the package I signed up for. One would expect average driving skills...or maybe a bit below. I could deal with that. What we witness is way way below average to the point of absurdly dangerous, and frankly I just don't understand it. It is what it is, I understand.
  25. 4 points
    I enjoyed the article. Far too many people were enticed to move to Panama because they were led to believe they could live above their means here. Those people have been gravely disappointed. Other people didn't do enough due diligence about what you should expect from roads, utilities, and emergency services here. They have been gravely disappointed. Other people didn't understand the bureaucratic complexities for all things from immigration to car registration. They have been gravely disappointed. But, the people who come here and can go with the flow and adjust their expectations will find a beautiful country with some wonderful people. There is an old saying that one man's trash is another man's treasure. Our decision to move here was a good one.
  26. 4 points
    We stopped in this church yesterday on the way to Penonome. Religious or not it is truely amazing. It's the first pueblo the spaniards established according to the locals. In 1520 they landed there. You can't see the Pacific from town but it is very close. Most of the church and most things inside are original. The stone wagon wheels are the best things displayed to me. In three years the church will be 500 years old! There is a huge original bronze statue there also. We got there at noon, walked in and they were baptizing kids. We stayed for the service. I'm not catholic but enjoyed the service. My girlfriend is catholic and she was amazed also. She had never seen this church and she is a Bouquetena. I did a blog on this before and it is worth mentioning again. If you're bored----take a ride to Nata. Nata is located between Santiago and Penonome----about 180 miles from Boquete more or less.
  27. 4 points
    I don't know how libel law in Panama is adjudicated, but I can say that if a legal system does not hold that truth is an absolute defense to a charge of slander or libel, it is not a justice system at all. It would be a system serving only the corrupt and powerful. If truth is not a defense, then anyone may successfully sue for being offended.
  28. 4 points
    Pondering this I can only reflect on thoughts Bill and I had when we first decided to reside outside of the USA for our retirement. Laws change, procedures change and the climate of life changes ..and possible more so in foreign countries. We were also aware that in spite of all our research we may have missed something. We knew that it might not be easy and at times frustrating but decided we would weather whatever transpired. It's been 10 yrs and some things have in fact changed and we did miss a few things we should have known I guess but we are happy here. Very happy. We've had some fun times navigating bumps in the road in fact !
  29. 4 points
    You are welcome to go to the Prosecuters office at any time and look through the records yourself. They are open to anyone, they are PUBLIC FOR ALL TO SEE.
  30. 4 points
    Very well said. And life is not stress free even in one's country of origin. People who thrive after a move "abroad" are those who adapt quickly to change and view the move as an adventure and opportunity to learn. Others? Well, the stress is too much and they return to their country of origin at an enormous cost, as Brundageba said. When I moved to Volcan 13 years ago and began the enlarging and extensive remodeling of an old Panamanian house, I had never lived in such "primitive" conditions in my life. The work took at least two years. And the growth of Volcan and conveniences that exist today did not back then. Yes, there were some stressful times (still are), but it was an adventure (still is) and I never regretted moving here. I'm still very grateful for my life here in Volcan. And a learning experience? One thing I've developed here is a LOT of patience! I have a wonderful employee and although I pay him very well, no way could I pay someone in the US to do what all he does. Then there is my beloved family of 18 dogs (okay, okay, sometimes they are stressful) and my work with the spay/neuter clinics. With the clinics and the rescue of dogs, I have found my true purpose in life. I would never have found that in the US. I have learned so much about care and treatment of dogs through the years that I and my employee often help people with injuries and illnesses of their own dogs. Right now is the best time in my life, ever. Too bad that some people swallow the rose-colored claims by the hucksters. One size indeed does not fit all.
  31. 4 points
    This is an ongoing problem with people who advertise their business or charity event. They get so caught up in their project that they assume everyone knows who they are and where they are. I know the Newslady and she refuses to screen the emails for missing information. This is the responsibility of those who write the news.boquete emails. It never ceases to amaze me how lacking in basic rudimentary knowledge of salesmanship most people are. They put stupid subject lines on their emails (like "please post") and never think for one second that they have to entice the reader to open the email in the first place. They spend 10 seconds slapping out an email on their I-pad and expect 2000 readers to care enough to open it and read it. It's my opinion that if you expect to burden almost 2000 inboxes, you ought to spend some time composing something that is complete, readable, informative and accurate. My dos centavos worth . . . .
  32. 4 points
    To clarify - yes we were both single when we got married. We had a choice of getting married in the US, in Colombia or in Panama. Colombia was the easiest, least expensive and least complicated as far as paperwork. When it comes to a resident visa in Panama, the marriage is only important in the fact that it is needed to prove that my Panama company (Friendly Nations Visa via my Panama S.A.) is what is providing the income. Neither of us are pensionados and she does not qualify for any other type of visa. My point was that in order to get the paperwork to prove our marriage in Colombia, we would need to go to Colombia to get it and upon returning they will not let her enter the country. So the lawyer suggested that if we could not return with the paperwork, then we should essentially lie to Panama and get married here again as if we were single. This goes to my point that yet another so called reputable lawyer's answer is for us it to lie and create false paperwork to get around what should be a simple trip to get proof of marriage. This is the system here. Lie, cheat, get around the rules and play the game. I did it before for 5 years because I was naive. I am smart enough now to know that Panama is going to keep changing the rules with new decrees. What the Panama and the lawyer tell me today will not be what the facts tomorrow. Admittedly we are in an unusual situation. Looking at her passport it appears she has been border hopping for the last year. In fact we were merely dating and travelling between the two countries until we finally got married a few months ago. The lawyer had no answer when I asked what the difference was between visiting often and border hopping. Everything we did for the last year was legal and within the laws, rules and decrees at that time. Our visits were always in one country or the other for at least a month length - not a 3 day hop. Is there a way for us to go thru the system and get her a visa? Yes. The cost is estimated at $5,000+ due to various circumstances. There is no simple way for Panama to look at my residency for the last 8 years and then give her a spousal visa for some additional fee. On the other hand, Colombia looks at me as her new husband and says I can have spousal visa for about $200 (effective immediately) and then permanent residency and dual citizenship after 3 years. The process is a few hours long and my passport is updated within a week or two. As one lawyer told me - Panama sees the border hoppers as a great deal of money if it can just force them into a visa process. And I do not disagree that people should be here legally. I have proudly showed my papers at every checkpoint and admired the country for making sure people were legal. My complaint is that they are punishing the very people who want to go thru the process, such as my wife. Don't get me wrong, I love my life here and I have fought hard to be here legally. As I said in my original post, I am raising the white flag. I have lived here and been a supporting member of the community. I have employed dozens of Panamanians and given to the country in many ways. I have changed as Panama evolved and sought to always be honest and forthright. Panama is asking too much. The lawyer sharks are circling ready to lie and cheat with promises of a simple visa that is just a mirage. I think I will swim somewhere else, thanks...
  33. 4 points
    In my role as one of two U.S. Wardens in Boquete, I have observed first hand the consequences of gringos having no health insurance. Only today I dealt with a case of a man being taken to Hospital Mae Lewis with a heart attack only to be transferred to Hospital Regional when it was discovered he had no insurance. He also had not registered to make his veteran's benefits potentially responsible for some of the costs. I encourage each and every one of you who has opted not to have health insurance to pay a visit to Hospital Regional to observe what your care would be like were you to suffer an accident or illness requiring hospitalization.
  34. 4 points
    As far as the invasion of Marion's home goes and her subsequent attempted murder, I do not think anyone has been prosecured for it even though the police caught at least two of the perps. Just prior to Marion leaving the Country she was called back in by DIJ for a further "interview" and she did mention that she was uncomfortable with the way it was conducted. I would suspect, that since she has gone to Mexico, that nothing further will be done. This was my first (and so far only) introduction to Panamanian detectiving and as a retired police officer I was not terribly impressed. It seemed to me that everything was about "process" and not much about investigation. Lots and lots of police officers on scene, many at the hospital, numerous long interviews done where the preamble to the interview ( both verbal and written) seemed to take much longer than the interview itself. I couldn'd help getting the impression that everything was being done for show. Given that experience, I would not trust the Panamanian police to investigate and prosecute expat crimes. Yes, there are a ton of people in the David jail, but for what, exactly? Seems to me most of them must be on remands waiting for trial, heck if Wild Bill hasn't been tried yet after admitting murders it does not bode well for a contested prosecution. I guess all of the above can be distilled down to "you are responsible for your own safety". Indeed, this isn't Kansas, or Canada, or Britain. Look after youselves and take care.
  35. 4 points
    Excuse me, but Rogelio Bellido is an online friend for many years and is a member of this site, as equal as any other. There is no import as to his nationality or place of residence. His comments and input are appreciated by me no matter where he posts them.
  36. 4 points
    Yesterday, July 31, Anouk (our 2 year old rescue Husky) was scheduled for the Amigos de Animales spay/neuter clinic. We arrived an hour and a half earlier than the appointed start time and discovered other pet owners with their animals already waiting in the parking lot. Anouk was excited. A novel car ride, no food or water since last evening, and other dogs barking caused her to jump around inside the vehicle. Not an easy task trying to calm her. Finally she takes a nap. We were fortunate to be assigned a low number for the surgery line. Bud waited in the registration area and I stayed with Anouk in the car. Some drivers came speeding into the lot and parked close to the building to unload their crates containing dogs and cats. The scene that caught my attention and touched my heart was the Indigenous family that walked to the clinic with the little boy carrying his special pet dog. At the appointed hour, volunteers put equipment (e.g., cages, etc.) in place, opened the doors, and the program began. First step was a short registration procedure, which Bud took care of while I sat with Anouk in the car. Lots of people, noisy animals, and all kinds of activity -- but well organized. I was impressed how helpful and friendly all volunteers and team members were. Mr. Huff (don't know his first name) explained the routine. We watched and accompanied Anouk as she started through the process. That the helpers knew their role and the routine of animals moving along the surgery line was obvious. A well organized and trained staff of people were at their assigned stations, starting with Dra Chely administrating the anesthesia, others shaving the animal before surgery, tattooing the letter "S" in the animal's ear, hand carrying the dog or cat to the appropriate surgery table for the operation, and then making certain each patient received an injection of vitamins and antibiotics before receiving individual monitoring and rubbing on the "wake-up" blankets. Dra "Ingrid" (don't know her full name) was the vet that operated on Anouk. Sigrid was the attendant who took good care of Anouk at the recovery station, petting her, checking vital signs, etc., until Anouk was awake enough to go home. A "trolley" carried our 40 plus pound dog to our vehicle and placed her (half asleep) in the back of the SUV for the trip home. Anouk doesn't like it, but after getting her home we placed a bonnet (parabolic collar) around her neck to keep her from scratching or licking her wound. We had already purchased such a collar at Melo based on recommendations of some friends. We hope this helps in the healing process. Now the job is trying to keep her quiet (no cat chasing) for the next several days! Here are some pictures that Bud took with his iPhone during our time at the Clinic. The shaving/preparation station. (That is Anouk, out like a light). The tattoo station (that is not Anouk, but another pet, and another awaiting the procedure). Anouk on the operating stand with Dra "Ingrid" and a helper. Some of the volunteers at the recovery station with a small kitten. Magaly, part of Anouk's "rescue team". Magaly is super nice and so helpful. (Well, actually all the volunteers were wonderful!) Magaly is very special to us because she is one of the people who brought Anouk into our lives. Marcelyn looking after Anouk at the post-surgery clean up station, and also where some shots are administered. Sigrid helping bring Anouk back to the real world, and checking vital signs, etc.
  37. 4 points
    If I run across reports of local or regional current events, I'm inclined to take a few minutes to share with others. It's information.
  38. 4 points
    Danielle/Olga With all the due respect I dont think that having lived some years in Panama and having been married with a Panamanian give her the truth about Panama and Panamanians. She has written so many things that are not correct, biased and with wrong and false information. I did posted a couple of times some corrections of her posting but .... looks like she didnt like it to much. That is why I did mainly participated at Boquete.Ning. Just to clarify facts and information given wrongly to the members. But you know what I got tired of this and did not really care any more. I was one of the couple of real panamanian participating at Boquete.ning giving information, facts and help to many members of NIng.
  39. 4 points
    Vietnam 45 years and 20 days ago I came home. Would I do it again? NO WHY? This war had nothing to do with our national interest or in defense of our nation. Unjustified wars kill innocent soldiers and civilians. Are there justified wars? Yes. 45 years and 20 days ago I came home to the USA. Too many sleepless nights with nightmares in the past 45 years. Have a nice memorial day everyone. LikeShow more reactions CommentShare
  40. 4 points
    Under Lee's guidance, participation, collaboration, and even dissension were encouraged which provided a wealth of information and a broad spectrum of opinion. All of which made .ning a true community forum, imo. I also miss our always friendly chats and verbal jousts that were exchanged when we would bump into each other.
  41. 4 points
    Keith, with regard to your last sentence: as the Brits would say "spot on, chap". There are some interesting "lessons to be learned" here on the part of the organizations that work on security matters. There is the immediate "news" type reporting that would have few details, and be as close to real time as possible. Some people would dismiss this kind of reporting, but I submit that there is value in the "news" kind of report for two basic reasons: to alert people in the area to be on guard for their own security, and/or if alerted early on and someone hearing the report was in the area, then perhaps they might see something of interest that could be valuable (the direction of a certain car leaving at high speed, for example). After the "news" type immediate reports, then there are investigations, and all the other kind of reports that people talk about. One thing that Rodny has been very good about is his alerts. They may not be perfect, but they are better than nothing. AaC and RD, among others, get to decide how they operate and what their policies are, and should do so given concerns about privacy and statutory requirements, etc. But I remain firm in my opinion that "news" reports (aka alerts) of criminal activity are of value and I wish to see them. And then I really am dreaming here by wanting every crime to be reported in the public domain. My opinion is that such information would result in a huge public support for better resources for the police, and better laws for them to work with as tools to keep us as safe as can be reasonably expected. The bottom line, however, remains that each of us is responsible for our own security. No police person can ever be at a crime scene "in time", even if they had a vehicle that traveled at the speed of light. The one exception to the speed of light rule would be if the police person is the victim or just happened to be at the scene when it started. Faster alerts with as much information as possible are in the public interest.
  42. 4 points
    Kudos to Dottie for getting the title renamed and simply saying "I see your point... sorry". It is so refreshing to be able to have a discussion with different points of view without the bitterness and attacks. Virtual pat on the back and gold star Dottie. I like this place.
  43. 4 points
  44. 4 points
  45. 4 points
    Be assured, there is a growing number of people who are very interested and concerned about the influx of hustlers disguised as Christians.
  46. 4 points
    I find it interesting too, Bud, as there is a lot of interest in this locally. I'm inclined to think that, given the short attention span of many people, the article may have been too long to spark their interest. Another possibility is that folks are afraid of ruining afoul of the forum rules in responding since this topic has generated such strong feelings. It is possible to discuss the issue without getting into personal attacks. And I think Mr. Jackson's history lessons are an essential element when considering the influx of evangelicals or Endtimers to our community. Those who have taken a live-and-let-live attitude toward these people should be fully aware of the threat that such extremists pose to the rest of us. Mr. Jackson suggests that their coming here in droves is not a matter of amusement because, and I quote, The writer offers examples of how this type of activity on the part of radical expatriates, who consider themselves to be sovereign powers exempt from Panamanian laws, threatens us all if and when they gain the attention they are seeking because they may come to be seen as representative of expats in general.
  47. 4 points
    For the record, JLM has offered to put our ad back up on Boquete,ning. We politely declined. We will use future marketing funds to sponsor Lance Armstrong on his next Tour de France competition.
  48. 4 points
    In the time it took to place FOUR posts on Ning, Planet Telecom's Response to NING advertising Renewal was gone.....vanished. Try figure how non-Boquete conspiracy theory essays that have not one iota to do with life here in Boquete can last 4 pages...and with the urging of the ole guard to moderate that diatribe over there. Ambreen seemed to enjoy being asleep at the wheel with such posted content and replies. Well I guess she is guarding the nest now. Al's was zapped in a millisecond. Chica's insertion of a letter promoting Ning's advertising written by Ambreen Ghazi contains mis-information to prospective advertisers I'd say. Advertisers will leave as quickly as we all did, watch. Thy will follow Alain's Planet Telecom out.
  49. 4 points
    GREAT article !!! Very well written and so very true. You'll be caught by surprise. The very folks you thought would die with you here will be leaving next year....the best of friends go. The newest ones can be at your throat in a second because they have "better ides", "better ways of doing stuff' and can't stand the way you think or do things. ( you've become "local") In time if you stay ...you slow down, you become a bit more tolerant, you roll with the punches and get over being upset about stuff here quicker. So much of it really doesn't matter. In time we forget about the conspiracy theories we talked about all the time and they don't matter either. Suddenly what matters is the beauty of the sunrise and sunset, good health, fresh air, a loving husband, great neighbors and a sweet dog. You stay....you're content. Life's good.
  50. 4 points
    Pretty soon most of us who have been around the longest and therefore have the best information and advice to offer will be gone from boquete.ning. That's a loss not only to ning but also to newcomers and to those exploring Boquete as a possible retirement destination. It looks as though it soon will enter the ranks of International Living and other publications that unconscionably, unethically entice people abroad without being honest about the realities.
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